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Each month, we pick three must-read articles that shed some light on our practice areas. This month's theme is: HIRE BETTER.

THREE TO READ | NOVEMBER 2017

1.)  Don't miss this recent piece by Mic  about lying in the hiring process. Per the article, a 2017 CareerBuilder survey indicates that 75% of hiring managers say they've caught a resume lie. But the data doesn't stop there- two separate studies found that men are more likely to lie in the process of getting a job than women.

"Some data suggests there could be a gender divide in who lies: In a recent self-reported survey of 1,000 full-time workers by the online course site Udemy, men are three times more likely than women to tell falsehoods about their job skills and qualifications. A separate survey by online resume template company Hloom found that 24.4% of men said they've told a "white lie" on their resume, compared to 18.5% of women."

2.) Some interesting advice on spotting deceit in the hiring process can be found in this piece by MedReps.com, including advice on "giving the silent treatment" to a potential hire:

"Trouble candidates love it when recruiters do all the talking. The less they speak, the less chance they’ll get caught in a lie. In addition, these candidates have very little substance. They may be good at banter, but not at proving themselves capable of effectively performing the job."

3.) The end of 2017 saw an uptick in EEOC lawsuits pertaining to people with disabilities. Mauro Ramirez astutely analyzed this phenomenon on Law360.com, and one of the key takeaways was this:

"The EEOC pursued individual termination claims where it believed that an employer failed to thoroughly engage in the interactive process.
Aside from class-based claims, the EEOC has also filed various individual termination suits. Although these suits do not always involve leave issues, they still center on an employer’s obligation to engage in an interactive process (an individualized, back-and-forth communication about whether a reasonable accommodation would enable the employee to perform the essential functions of the job)."

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